2020 Legislative Session

Passed the Senate and the House

Motorized/Suction Dredge Mining Ban (SB 5322 / HB 1261)

Passed the House on Feb 12 1st substitute bill substituted (ENVI 19).(View 1st Substitute)Floor amendment(s) adopted. Rules suspended. Placed on Third Reading.Third reading, passed; yeas, 60; nays, 35;

Passed the Senate on Mar 5 yeas, 37; nays, 10; absent, 0; excused, 2. (View Roll Calls)

In the House Mar 6 Speaker signed.

In the Senate Mar 7 President signed.

Mar 9th Delivered to Governor.

This bill would bring Washington in compliance with the Clean Water Act rules and ban suction dredge mining in designated critical habitat for ESA listed Salmonids.

Water & Energy Conservation C-PACER (SB 6222 / HB 2405)

Passed the House on Feb 18 2nd substitute bill substituted (APP 20).(View 2nd Substitute) yeas, 93; nays, 4;

Passed the Senate on Mar 5 yeas, 40; nays, 7; absent, 0; excused, 2. (View Roll Calls)

In the House Mar 7 House concurred in Senate amendments. Passed final passage; yeas, 93; nays, 4; absent, 0; excused, 1

Mar 9th Speaker of the House signed. March 10th Senate President signed.

March 11th delivered to the Governor.

This bill would allow building owners to finance conservation improvements over the life of the structure, making it cost-effective. This legislation would provide clear benefits to building owners and the environment by reducing utility bills and increasing property values, generating local jobs, and incentivizing water and energy conservation.

Ecology’s Drought Legislation (HB 1622 / SB 5675)

Passed the House on Jan 29 yeas, 79; nays, 17 (View Roll Calls)

Passed the Senate on Mar 5 Committee amendment(s) adopted with no other amendments. yeas, 48; nays, 0; absent, 0; excused, 1. (View Roll Calls)

In the House Mar 7 House concurred in Senate amendments.Passed final passage; yeas, 87; nays, 10; absent, 0; excused, 1.

Mar 9th Speaker signed. March 10th Senate President signed.

March 11th delivered to the Governor.

This legislation would create tools and resources to build long-term drought resiliency among water users and communities, improve the State’s ability to respond to droughts in the short term, and codify many of the best practices identified in the updated 2018 Washington plan developed collaboratively between eight state agencies.

Reusable Bag Bill (SB 5323 / HB 1205)

On Jan 15 passed Senate yeas, 30; nays, 19

Passed the House on Mar 7 yeas, 67; nays, 29; absent, 0; excused, 2. 

Mar 9 Senate concurred in House amendments.Passed final passage; yeas, 33; nays, 15; absent, 0; excused, 1. (View Roll Calls)

March 11 Senate President signed. March 11 Speaker of the House signed.

March 12 delivered to the Governor.

The legislation would prohibit thin single-use carryout bags, and require a 8 cent charge for paper carryout bags and plastic film bags, thereby incentivizing the use of durable carryout bags.

Low-Water Landscaping (HB 1165)

Passed House on Jan 27 yeas, 93; nays, 4; absent, 0; excused, 1. (View Roll Calls)

Passed Senate on Mar 3 yeas, 46; nays, 2; absent, 0; excused, 1

In the House Mar 5 Speaker signed.

In the Senate Mar 6 President signed.

Mar 9th Delivered to Governor.

This bill empowers private property owners and removes obstacles to water use efficiency by prohibiting unreasonable homeowner association, common interest ownership association, and condominium association restrictions that limit private proper owners’ ability to deploy low-water landscaping techniques, while also ensuring private owners’ ability to create fire safe landscapes

Copper Antifouling Paint Ban (SB 6210 / HB 2385)

Passed the Senate on Feb 17 Senate 1st substitute bill substituted (WM 20).(View 1st Substitute) passed; yeas, 47; nays 0

Passed the House on Mar 4 yeas, 97; nays, 0; absent, 0; excused, 1. (View Roll Calls)

In the Senate Mar 5 President signed.

In the House Mar 5 Speaker signed.

The most popular ‘antifouling’ paint, to prevent the growth of algae and barnacles on the underside of vessels, is copper-based and has toxic environmental impacts and negative effects on endangered salmon and other aquatic life. The legislation will extend a current ban on copper antifouling paint until 2026 to give Ecology authority to gather information.

Passed the Senate did not pass out of committee in the House

Commercial Water Bottling (SB 6278)

Feb 17 Senate 1st substitute bill substituted (AWNP 20).(View 1st Substitute) Floor amendment(s) adopted.Rules suspended. Placed on Third Reading.Third reading, passed; yeas, 28; nays, 20

Feb 20 First reading, referred to Environment & Energy

Feb 26 Scheduled for public hearing in the House Committee on Rural Development, Agriculture, & Natural Resources at 8:00 AM in anticipation of other legislative action.

Feb 28 Executive session scheduled, but no action was taken in the House Committee on Rural Development, Agriculture, & Natural Resources at 8:00 AM.

Did not pass out of committee in the House

This bill would declare that use of water for commercial bottling is detrimental to the public welfare and the public interest. This would bar Ecology from issuing new water rights for water bottling purposes.

Styrofoam Ban (SB 6213)

Feb 20 First reading, referred to Environment & Energy.

Feb 25 Scheduled for public hearing in the House Committee on Environment & Energy at 3:30 PM (Subject to change). (Committee Materials)

Feb 27 Executive session scheduled, but no action was taken in the House Committee on Environment & Energy at 8:00 AM. (Committee Materials)

Did not pass out of committee in the House

Passed the House did not pass out of committee in the Senate

Tackling Climate Change in Growth Management (HB 2427)

Feb 16 House 1st substitute bill substituted (ENVI 20).(View 1st Substitute)Floor amendment(s) adopted.Rules suspended. Placed on Third Reading.Third reading, passed; yeas, 59; nays, 37

Feb 18 Senate First reading, referred to Local Government.

Feb 25 Scheduled for public hearing in the Senate Committee on Local Government at 8:00 AM 

Did not pass out of committee in the Senate

This bill would ensure comprehensive plans, development regulations, and regional policies, plans, and strategies adapt to and mitigate the effects of a changing climate; support state greenhouse gas emission reduction requirements and state vehicle miles traveled goals; build resilient infrastructure; and nurture environmental, economic, and human health.

Legislation that did pass out of committee

Ecology’s Water Banking Bill (HB2603 / SB 6494)

Feb 6 Executive action taken in the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Water, Natural Resources & Parks at 1:30 PM. (Committee Materials) AWNP – Majority; 1st substitute bill be substituted, do pass. Feb 7 Passed to Rules Committee for second reading.

Feb 7 Executive action taken in the House Committee on Rural Development, Agriculture, & Natural Resources at 10:00 AM. RDAN – Majority; 1st substitute bill be substituted, do pass.(Majority Report) Minority; do not pass.

Referred to Rules 2 Review.

Did not pass out of committee

Senate Bills

Water Right in Trust for Drought Mitigation (SB 6036)

public hearing Jan. 14.

did not pass out of committee

This bill would allow a donor to place a water right in trust while specifying that Ecology may use the water for drought mitigation.

Tribal Traditional & Cultural Interests in Water Resources (SB 6260)

public hearing Jan 21.

did not pass out of committee

This bill recognizes tribal interest in water resources and would mandate that tribal interests in water be considered “up front” when water use decisions are made, and tribal interests are considered when a new water permit is granted.

Water Right Sales (SB 6292)

public hearing Jan 21.

did not pass out of committee

This bill would prevent Ecology from accepting water rights that have not been beneficially used by their holders into a water bank unless the bank is created for the purpose of mitigation, supplying third parties, or enhancing streamflows and operates solely within a local watershed.

Trust Water Public Interest Standard (SB 6301)

public hearing Jan 21.

did not pass out of committee

This bill adds a public interest standard to the Department of Ecology’s approval process for transfers and modifications of water rights. Ecology would consider the economic benefits to the locality and state, the cost-effectiveness and water efficiency of a new use, effects on instream flow, consistency with water resource plans and growth management plans, effects on public lands, facilities, and navigable waters.

Water Infrastructure Program (SB 6345)

introduced.

did not pass out of committee

This bill would create a “water infrastructure program” that would provide grants, financed by up to $5billion in state bonds, to fund projects for the purpose of increasing the availability of water for out-of-stream purposes, reducing flood risks, improving fish passage, and reducing stormwater pollution. Grant proposals would be evaluated by the Office of the Columbia River, Office of the Chehalis Basin, or the Fish Passage Barrier Removal Board, as applicable.

House Bills

Stream Flows (HB 1979)

reintroduced. public hearing Jan 21.

did not pass out of committee

Work Group on Water Resource Policy (HB 2553)

introduced.

did not pass out of committee

This bill would create a joint executive, legislative, and interagency workgroup tasked with creating a statewide water action plan recommending changes to statutes, rules, and policies.

CELP’s Position

PASSED THE SENATE AND THE HOUSE

Motorized/Suction Dredge Mining Ban (SB 5322 / HB 1261)

CELP supports this bill.

Suction dredge mining uses gas-powered dredges to vacuum rocks, gravel, and sediment from the bottom of creeks in rivers in search of gold. This destructive practice degrades water quality through erosion and sedimentation, destroys aquatic habitat for endangered salmonids, kills eggs and larvae, and can strand fish and denude riparian vegetation. This practice has been banned or strictly regulated in California, Oregon, and Idaho. Time for Washington to step up.

Water & Energy Conservation C-PACER (SB 6222 / HB 2405)

CELP supports this bill.

This program reduces barriers for building owners to meet energy and water conservation goals while improving and extending the life of their buildings.

Ecology’s Drought Legislation (HB 1622 / SB 5675)

CELP supports this bill.

Washington state has experienced increased frequency and severity of droughts during summer months in recent years. As the climate continues to change, modernizing Washington’s drought statutes is critical to effectively prepare for and respond to increasing drought emergencies and to protect our vulnerable communities.

Reusable Bag Bill (SB 5323 / HB 1205)

CELP supports this bill.

Single-use plastic bags made from nonrenewable natural gas and oil resources are among the most commonly found items littering state roads, waterways, and the ocean.

Low-Water Landscaping (HB 1165)

CELP supports this bill.

Copper Antifouling Paint Ban (SB 6210 / HB 2385)

CELP supports this bill.

While we reluctantly support an extension of the current 2021 ban, we oppose any effort to set a standard for copper antifouling paint in the statute.

PASSED THE SENATE did not pass out of committee in the House

Commercial Water Bottling (SB 6278)

CELP supports this bill.

Washington’s waters belong to the people of Washington. There has been an increasing number of proposals to locate commercial water bottling plants in Washington. These plants would allow Washington’s water to be taken for the benefit of corporations and users outside of the local area, perhaps out-of-state.

Styrofoam Ban (SB 6213)

CELP supports this bill.

PASSED THE HOUSE did not pass out of committee in the Senate

Tackling Climate Change in Growth Management (HB 2427)

CELP supports this bill.

BILLS THAT DID NOT PASS OUT OF COMMITTEE

Ecology’s Water Banking Bill (HB 2603 / SB 6494)

CELP generally supports but has some concerns about this bill.

Senate Bills

Water Right in Trust for Drought Mitigation (SB 6036)

CELP opposes this bill.

There are better strategies for dealing with drought. We urge legislators to support Ecology’s Drought bill instead (HB 1622/SB 5675).

Tribal Traditional & Cultural Interests in Water Resources (SB 6260)

CELP supports this bill.

Tribal rights flow from treaties between the U.S. and area tribes, and generally have a priority date of “time immemorial”. Tribal water rights not only support tribal cultures and economies but are critical for supporting the state’s salmon populations. While tribal rights have not been quantified in most cases, they may not be impaired by later water use. This bill adds consideration of tribal interests to the factors Ecology must consider when evaluating a new water use application.

Water Right Sales (SB 6292)

CELP has concerns about this bill.

Trust Water Public Interest Standard (SB 6301)

CELP has concerns about this bill.

Water Infrastructure Program (SB 6345)

CELP opposes this bill.

House Bills

Stream Flows (HB 1979)

CELP opposes this bill.

Work Group on Water Resource Policy (HB 2552)

CELP has concerns about this bill.