Monthly Archives: March 2021


Washington Water Watch: March Edition

Dear Friends,

It has now been over a year since the start of the pandemic, and all our lives have changed. We hope you and your loved ones have stayed safe and well. All of us at CELP have adapted to our new normal of working remotely and spending a lot of our time in Zoom meetings. But even with these challenges, we have been able to continue our important work to protect and restore Washington’s waters. We have participated in watershed restoration work groups finding solutions to restore stream flows impaired by new permit exempt wells, and we continue working with stakeholders to find solutions to water speculation and improve the water trust and banking systems.

We have also taken this time to find inspiration and think about how CELP accomplishes our mission of protecting, preserving, and restoring waters across the state now and into the future. We envision a water management system in Washington state that is more equitable and sustainable to support healthy ecosystems, thriving fish and wildlife, and robust communities. These are big goals, but with your help, we are ready to do the work.

In this issue you’ll find a wrap up of Clean & Abundant Water lobby week, an update on the legislative session, the Nooksack Indian Tribe and Lummi Nation’s webinar on adjudication, CELP’s letter to Ecology with concerns over Crown Columbia’s application for an area-wide water permit, water and fish in the news, and appreciation for our members.

Sincerely,

Trish Rolfe

Executive Director

Read the full newsletter here.


Employment Opportunity: Water Policy Outreach Coordinator

UPDATE POSITION HAS BEEN FILLED

CELP is hiring a Water Policy Outreach Coordinator.

Water Policy Outreach Coordinator

Part-time: 20 hours per week

Water Policy Outreach Coordinator will work closely with CELP’s ED, Staff Attorney, Government Affairs Specialist and Board to build public support to accomplish program goals by coordinating community engagement to influence water policy change.

Duties include the following:

Works with the director to devise and recommend a plan and strategy for organizing and engaging volunteers and community allies.

Identifies recruits and organizes volunteers

Develops and implements a variety of engagement strategies including on-line and face-to-face to develop networks to support CELP goals.

Maintains and develops new partnerships with affinity groups who share many common goals and values. 

Develop relationships with community leaders, tribes, other organizations and officials who can influence water policy change.

Plan and implement community outreach events to generate public support with agency decision makers and in the media.

Identifies and is responsible for developing strong relationships with key people of influence including community leaders and public officials to influence positive campaign or program outcomes.

Coordinates and measures success of activities with manager and campaign or program leads to ensure progress towards mission and goals.

Performs administrative and clerical duties as assigned by supervisor.

Performs miscellaneous duties as directed.

Requirements, Knowledge & Skills:

  • 4-year degree preferred.
  • At least 1-year experience working with volunteers in the environmental movement, political campaigns, or other, similar organizations to plan and implement grassroots campaigns.
  • Basic knowledge of current environmental issues affecting Washington.  
  • Excellent writing and editing skills. 
  • Demonstrated skill in writing and producing newsletters.
  • On-line organizing experience is a plus.
  • Passion for the environment and a belief in the power of community organizing and policy advocacy.
  • Excellent verbal communication skills and demonstrated ability to clearly articulate ideas and easily strike up conversation with diverse groups of people.
  • Strong organizational and problem-solving skills and ability to work effectively in action-oriented office.
  • Ability to work independently, cooperatively and effectively with public, staff and volunteers. Strong ability to network, build trust, and build working relationships.
  • Ability to be flexible and responsive in a fast-paced and changing environment
  • Ability to think strategically and plan programs and campaigns and to collaborate effectively with others
  • Access to reliable transportation and willingness to accommodate community-based scheduling needs (i.e. meetings held in the evenings and on weekends at offsite locations)
  • Valid driver’s license, satisfactory driving record, and proof of auto insurance required.
  • Proficient computer skills including Microsoft Office, social networking sites, and database software.

The CELP office is in Seattle, however current COVID restrictions will require most work to be done remotely. Once restrictions are lifted a large portion of the job will be traveling around the state to relevant communities and locations.

$16.75 – $17 per hour plus accrued vacation and sick leave. Travel allowance and transit benefit available. 

E-mail cover letter, resume, and references to Trish Rolfe, trolfe@celp.org by May 15, 2021. Please, no phone inquiries.

CELP is an equal opportunity employer and actively works to ensure fair and equal treatment of its employees and constituents regardless of differences based on culture, socioeconomic status, race, marital or family situation, gender, age, ethnicity, religious beliefs, physical ability, or sexual orientation. CELP encourages BIPOC and LGBTQ applicants to apply.


Washington Water Watch: Jan. & Feb. Edition

February 16th 2021 

Happy New Year! We are starting the new year with a new administration, and with it hope for federal progress on clean and abundant water, strengthening tribal treaty rights, and modernizing the Columbia River Treaty.  

Photo of a winding road through snow and trees taken from an aerial view.

Here at home, we started the year with an atmospheric river soaking the pacific northwest. Seattle had the wettest start to the year in history. Olympia and Hoquiam also broke rainfall records in the first few days of the year. Now in February, snowstorms have moved across the state blanketing Seattle and the Puget Sound area. Snowpack in the Olympics and Cascades are at normal or slightly above normal levels. This is all good news for our stream flows for now. 

Everyone at CELP wants to say a big THANK YOU to all of our supporters. We know 2020 was a difficult year for many people, organizations and businesses and we are immensely grateful for your donations, time, ideas, and dedication to protecting our waters. With your support, we were able to face challenges head on and continue our work protecting our waters. We look forward to what we will accomplish this year together.

In this issue you’ll find introductions of our new board members and changes in board leadership, information on the 2021 legislative session and the bills we are tracking, salmon in the news, Rachael Osborn’s paper reflecting on the Water Resources Act of 1971, a call for applications for our 2021 legal internship, and congratulations to our 2020 Water Hero honoree and longtime friend Bob Anderson. 

We are hopeful for the future. As we move forward this year, our priorities are getting Streamflow Restoration Plans approved and getting water restoration and mitigation projects in these plans funded. We are also working to help get the adjudications of the Nooksack and Colville watersheds started and working with Ecology to restart instream flow setting for unprotected watersheds. These are big plans, but with your continued support we can make great strides to achieve them. 


Sincerely,

Trish Rolfe

Executive Director

trolfe@celp.org

Read the full newsletter here: https://conta.cc/3qstIii